2013: Music

The Happiest of New Years to you all. How many well-meant resolutions have you broken yet, then? It’s OK, you can tell us. We don’t judge.

As is blog tradition, the first week back must, must, must involve casting an eye – or ear, preferably, in this case – back at the year that’s passed us by all too quickly – starting with the music.

Ah, the music of 2013. Don’t sit too comfortably now, this shouldn’t take long. What an underwhelming year. Those horrible ‘Blurred Lines’… It was all either synth-heavy, scantily-clad, or so terribly dull, I find myself now agreeing even more with those grumps who grumble that perhaps there are just too many complacent, white public-schoolboys making (gap year?) pop and rock music (hear, hear, Sandie Shaw).

To be honest, maybe it’s my current state of mind, but I don’t feel they have much to say of relevance any more, and I find it both refreshing and exciting at the same time to find angry youths singing – nay, shouting – about real life’s many injustices again. I don’t know if the bias is because the most comfortable and privately-educated of the burgeoning middle-class will always be that much more wiser, confident, with a deeper understanding of how to get along in life, or because gutless record companies are increasingly appearing less willing to take a punt on those from poorer backgrounds, maybe favouring those who are able to support themselves (perhaps with a back-up plan and degree should it all fall to pieces), or because the genres I happen to have little time for, such as hip-hop and grime, tend to appeal more widely to the angst of the masses nowadays, leaving rock and pop sadly misrepresented and all too twee as a result.

How many poor kids get an electric guitar for Christmas? How many of their schools provide the opportunity to learn to play a musical instrument? How many community centres has austerity kept open in which to rehearse?

Anyway, I digress. No need to point out that George Orwell and John Lennon, obviously, and others were all quite well-off and still brilliant.

So, as for albums, I bought just two new releases in 2013, possibly the fewest I’ve bought in any year, and the few downloads were mainly from decades long gone. Shame. How many did you buy?

David Bowie released his twenty-fourth studio album, The Next Day, back in March; Elton John his thirty-first, The Diving Board, in September. Push the Sky Away was the fifteenth from Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, released in February. Pearl Jam presented their tenth, called Lightning Bolt, in October. Paul McCartney’s New, which also came out in October, was his sixteenth.

Did I miss anyone else when I was blowing the dust off my old CDs in search of inspiration and raw emotion? I should confess, I didn’t buy any of the above, didn’t even listen to much of it, although there were some good tunes on Paul McCartney’s that received fair radio-play.

For me, the best album of 2013 – by a long, long way – was Jake Bugg’s Shangri La. His second album (his eponymous first from 2012 was actually released in the US last year, so can fortunately be included here to make 2013 look better than it really was) and, could you believe, the boy’s not yet out of his teens? It’s as if someone decided to mix Ray Davies, Donovan, Peter Noone and Gene Pitney in a blender, if that doesn’t sound like the type of disturbed thing only someone who has seen too many gory horror films would suggest. (More on films and TV later this week, when we’ll see once again that they continue to put the music industry to shame.) In any case, I think young Jake’s so good, frankly, I couldn’t give a monkey’s about whatever else disappointed or bored me rigid in 2013. So there.

I offer up a few more tracks that stood out, just for the hell of it. Let me know if you like any of them and, please, for the love of music, include some suggestions of your own for us all to listen to.

– Jagwar Ma, ‘The Throw’
– King Krule, ‘Easy Easy’
– Paul McCartney, ‘New’
– Pearl Jam, ‘Mind Your Manners’
– Primal Scream, ‘It’s Alright, It’s OK’
– Sankofa, ‘Guttermouth’
– Stereophonics, ‘Graffiti on the Train’
– Telegram, ‘Follow’
– Temples, ‘Colours to Life’
– The Varese’s, ‘Spotlight’

Before I leave you to your clicking, I wouldn’t wish any lover of music to forget that 2013 was also the year we lost Peter Banks (Yes), Jeff Hanneman (Slayer), Ray Manzarek (The Doors), Reg Presley (The Troggs) and Richard Street (The Temptations); as well as hugely influential singer/songwriter/guitarists, J.J. Cale, Richie Havens and Lou Reed; and Country legend, George Jones. If you’d rather remember 2013 by recalling the myriad songs these great talents helped create in their lifetimes, nobody could blame you.

2013’s best television and film next time, then books. It’s going to be the busiest week we’ve had here in… well, about a year, probably.

Author: FEd

Features Editor of David Gilmour's official blog, The Blog ('Features' previously being its rather naff title), affectionately - or lazily - shortened to 'FEd'.

81 thoughts on “2013: Music”

  1. … do I turn myself into a conservative? I find it more and more difficult to enjoy newer “artists” and, I beg your pardon, it’s only because of their lack of musician-ship (please forgive my English here).

    So what were my additions to my collection? Michael Schenker’s “Bridge The Gap” (great guitarist), Black Sabbath’s “13” and a couple of older records as Rory Gallagher’s “Live In Montreux” for example.

    Jake Bugg was presented a couple of times in MTV and I found him very interesting. The songs seemed rather similar and I did buy his album.

    Funny off-topic: British ads seem to concentrate to gaming, cell phone plans, loans, perfumes and baby care stuff. I never trust statistics but teen pregnancy seems to be more common than here in Germany.

    Taki

    1. Ah, I stupidly forgot Black Sabbath. Almost 20 years since their last studio recording, if I’m not mistaken.

      I liked the sinister album cover, too. They really did assemble and burn those two giant wicker numbers.

      I shouldn’t have forgotten it.

  2. Happy RIP Birthday to Syd Barrett. May he be flying high with the aura borrellis and beyond…

  3. In terms of new music, 2013 was a bit ‘meh’ for me with a few exceptions and I too, found myself listening to ‘oldies’ and spending time discovering jewels from within the past decade.

    Forgive me if I’ve previously posted these …

    A ‘shout out’ to my Canadian family for bringing me Head of the Herd’s By This Time Tomorrow … The ‘relationship’ is barely 2 months old but I am very much enjoying getting to know them. The title track is excellent.

    Another collaboration by Joe Bonamassa and Beth Hart yielded Seesaw in May 2013 with an absolutely outstanding cover of Strange Fruit – one of my favourites from the album. I had the good fortune of being able to treat my husband to Joe Bonamassa tickets at the Beacon Theater in May – what a treat!

    I really enjoy Queens of the Stoneage and they didn’t disappoint with their mid-year release of …Like Clockwork.

    The Raven That Refused to Sing (And Other Stories) by Steven Wilson came to my attention because of the video for the title track which was mesmerizing visually. Having now listened to a few of the other tracks, it may end up in our library (am still ploughing through a mammoth list of ‘nice-to-haves’).

    Just for yucks … did Buckethead REALLY release 31, yes, 31 albums in 2013? 😮

    The hour is late and I probably should get some shut-eye and try again tomorrow.

    HAPPY NEW YEAR to all. 😀

    1. Just for yucks … did Buckethead REALLY release 31, yes, 31 albums in 2013?

      No way. Did he?

      I really like Head of the Herd.

    2. He sure did and I’ve listened to not one …

      Forgotten Library (2013)
      Pike 12 (2013)
      Pike 13 (2013)
      Pike 14 (2013)
      Pike 15 (2013)
      Pike 16 (2013)
      Pike 17 (2013)
      Pike 18 (2013)
      Pike 19 (2013)
      Pike 20 (2013)
      Pike 21 (2013)
      Pike 22 (2013)
      Telescape (2013)
      Slug Cartilage (2013)
      Pancake Heater (2013)
      Worms for the Garden (2013)
      Halls of Dimension (2013)
      Feathers (2013)
      Splatters (2013)
      Mannequin Cemetery (2013)
      Pearson’s Square (2013)
      Rise of the Blue Lotus (2013)
      Pumpkin (2013)
      Thank you Ohlinger’s (2013)
      The Pit (2013)
      Hollowed Out (2013)
      It Smells Like Frogs (2013)
      Twisterlend (2013)
      Pikes (2013)
      Coat of Charms (2013)
      Wishes (2013)

      1. Incredible. He’s put out 73 studio albums in all (two more have been released already this year, apparently).

  4. Happy new year all.

    Some of the albums that did it for me during 2013 included…

    Steven Wilson – The Raven That Refused To Sing
    Henry Fool – Men Singing
    Bruce Soord / Jonas Renkse – Wisdom of Crowds
    Leafblade – The Kiss of Spirit and Flesh
    Anathema – Universal

    Cheers.

  5. I’m wracking my brain to think of anything I bought in 2013 .. certainly nothing released in 2013.

    Oh dear. This really won’t do.

    To make matters worse, in response to finally signing up to the pay version of Spotify (those ads, those ads) I am currently working my way through a copy of “1001 albums you must hear before you die”. As this particular edition was published in 2005, it is really a rather retrograde move but it’s sobering how few of these I have previously listened to, let alone the Gawd-knows-how-many-albums-I’d-rather-die-than-listen-to from 2013.

    (BTW, I’m currently at album §64, choosing every 10th from the index … who’s said anything about OCD? .. which happened to be “Palo Congo” by Sabu (1957) so you can see just how out of it I really am!!

    I remain confident that there is some good stuff out there but we also may have to face the reality that (with the exception of the ever youthful Pavlov) we are just not tuned-in to what the Younger Generation are liking and listening to … Hang on – a youngish person recommended “Warpaint” to me the other day ….

    Hey, I can live with that ..

    1. it’s sobering how few of these I have previously listened to, let alone the Gawd-knows-how-many-albums-I’d-rather-die-than-listen-to from 2013.

      :)) Yep.

    2. Very much enjoyed Warpaint, Tim — there’s something faintly reminiscent of a South African ’90s indie venture called Fetish … they fell off the rails for a while although I believe the have regrouped.

  6. Am terribly embarrassed to admit that I have never heard of Jake Bugg. So far, so good. 🙂

    1. I confess I also hadn’t heard of him, but I agree he’s much better than you might imagine … Maybe he’s the real deal. Good performance on Graham Norton show for all you UK bloggers …

    2. I like Graham Norton. 🙂 Think I need to hear more Jake Bugg though because I wasn’t impressed. 🙁

      ash

    3. Thanks Fed. 🙂

      I hear it now.

      He’s very young to be such a proficient guitar player, seems capable of playing a few styles. He will be a good one to watch as he develops.

      I can see why he’s been nominated as a best newcomer (or has he won by now?)

      I dismissed him when he played on Graham Norton because of his vocals. I barely heard the music because I struggled to understand what he was saying. Simple Pleasures has a similar vocal problem to my ear, Country Song made me sit up and pay a bit more attention. I liked Two Fingers the best because his diction was much clearer, perhaps because of the tempo too.

      He’s only 19 and has struck out on his own! I am impressed now.

      Cheers Fed. 🙂

      ash

      1. Then have one more, seeing as it’s you: ‘Trouble Town’.

        Bit of rockabilly, touch of skiffle, folk-rock; the boy’s a storyteller with great swagger. It may well be nothing new, I accept it’s nostalgia, but it still comes across as more truthful than anything else that’s come out in years, and I’m relieved, not just glad, that a teenager is influenced by the music I have loved for so long and isn’t just twerking his way into the next vomit-inducing reality TV series in order to make a quick buck.

        How we’ve needed someone like him – no-nonsense, no-bullshit (I really hope the music industry, chock-full of bullshitters, doesn’t ruin him) – from the UK, to rise above our manufactured pop and challenge our incredibly boring, well-connected, privately-educated whiners.

        I think his latest award nomination is a Brit – for Best British Male Solo Artist. He’s up against a certain Bowie chap, though, who already has two Brit Awards.

        (Aren’t all these awards just a load of bullshit, anyway? Yeah, OK, so I’ve never forgiven the Brits for giving Best British Group and Best British Album to Blur, not Pink Floyd, in 1995 and probably never will.)

    4. :)) You’re right Fed! I really like the way you expressed your thoughts!

      Up against Bowie? Hmmm. Is it the public that vote for the Brits?

      I didn’t know who Jake Bugg was nor his amazing potential, until I discovered it here.

      I know I’m probably locked in a time warp but I guess any voters above about 40 will be like me and if they bother to vote it will be for a name they know.

      On the other hand, it may be that Jake has attracted younger fans who are more likely to be voters.

      I have to say that Bowie’s been out of the public eye for a while so his fans may not know he’s up for an award.

      With regard to awards, I think they are for people in the business to get together for a (huge) dinner party. We the public only ever hear who won what, we don’t go to the event, we only know what we see in the media. Award ceremonies mean absolutely nothing to the public I think.

      There you said it, any award ceremony that could place Bleugh above the Floyd, just shows how shallow it all is.

      There seem to have been a lot of film and/or TV awards recently, it could be that the only thing keeping these things alive, is the frocks and the red carpet photo opportunities. I’m certainly not interested. Maybe film buffs, real fanatics, are interested. If the public don’t attend, why on earth would we be interested?

      ash (you got me going on a good grumble then Fed :)) )

      1. …I guess any voters above about 40 will be like me and if they bother to vote it will be for a name they know.

        :)) Very diplomatic Ash!

    5. :)) Very diplomatic Ash!

      Oh no. . . have I put my foot in my mouth? Again?

      Somewhere else you said the Floyd didn’t need awards (or words to that effect). 🙂

      I agree, they stand by their talented body of work alone. I’m fairly sure their fans don’t care, we love the music.

      I was being a bit dry in my previous comments about awards and ceremonies, maybe there is something to ‘being recognised’ by your peers. Or newcomers being welcomed to the ‘circle’. After all, these stars are the only people who know what it’s like to be a star. Look at the extreme life of Michael Jackson for example, he never ever had a normal life so he had no ‘benchmark’ to refer back to. I think the business drove him mad. So if the stars recognise a youngster’s talent, the awards is a route to making friends in the business, thus mentors.

      I guess we all seek out kindred spirits, stars certainly have to be able to be themselves for their sanity and whilst they might be pleased to meet adoring fans which must get tedious, mixing with others in the same position as yourself is perhaps fulfilled at things like award ceremonies.

      I dunno, still matters not a jot to my life.

      We really need your kitchen table or a pub Pavlov. 😀

      ash

    6. It also came to my mind, there are awards in other walks of life, Nobel prizes for example. . . I wonder if they have big parties? The British honours, of which David is a recipient. 😀

      Sports Personality of The Year is another.

      So there are loads of awards for various things. I feel depressed now, there are no awards for nobodys. 🙁

      ash :))

    7. I certainly wouldn’t want to offend David and I hope he is not reading this, but I think that honorary degrees are silly and unfair. If people want to get a degree, they must work hard and earn it.

      Seeing as these are celebrities who are awarded this kind of honour (didn’t Alex Ferguson receive an honorary doctorate too in 2009? And also Arsène Wenger?), it’s all about good publicity for both sides, universities and recipients.

      I wonder if David could have refused the award. I think so.

    8. An award for nobodys? Or maybe nobodies?

      Sorry Ash, you would stand no chance – you’re definitely somebody.

      I reckon the Cheshire Cat would win … Or maybe his feline rival, Schrodinger’s cat … It would definitely be a cat …

    9. I certainly wouldn’t want to offend David and I hope he is not reading this, but I think that honorary degrees are silly and unfair. If people want to get a degree, they must work hard and earn it.

      But Michèle, hasn’t David become an expert in his field? There surely can’t be much more he could learn by attending university classes. He must have put in a lot of practice and study and learning by experimentation, been very dedicated to become the top in his class.

      When I was talking about the British honour David received (I should have used a capital H), I was referring to David’s CBE.

      You knew this Michèle, admit it, you were being cranky! :))

      ash

    10. David’s CBE…

      What troubles (embarrasses?) me is the ‘E’. I’m not sure if what I say makes sense. I mean that, personally, I would have declined this ‘honour’. The ‘honour’ to be associated with any (colonial) ‘Empire’? No, thank you.

    11. Just came across this article. Some very interesting comments below too. And yes, before anyone reminds me, I know about all the atrocities as well that were committed during Napoleon’s Empire/colonialism.

      ‘Colonialism’, what an awful word – in any language.

    12. The ‘honour’ to be associated with any (colonial) ‘Empire’? No, thank you.

      But you ARE associated with the Empire anyway, I’m afraid, if you were born in it – having or having no honour or “honour” – and will always be, excuse me Michèle.

      You can ask your Arabian fellow citizens if they want to come to their ancestors’ mother country, can’t you? Would you like to hear their answer? I just think, maybe the answer could be able to help to reassure you and somehow soothe your embarrassment.

      I don’t mean to offend you or anyone, but I think David is the only one person who can be or not be embarrassed with his CBE, excuse me, again.

    13. Sorry, Laterr, I don’t understand what you mean.

      I just wouldn’t feel honoured and wouldn’t want to be rewarded for being part of a colonial empire, even though I am part of it ‘physically’ (which is not even true as there is no more Empire here, unless you’re speaking of the Territoires d’Outre Mer???). Sorry if it doesn’t make sense.

      As for “I think David is the only one person who can be or not be embarrassed with his CBE” – Of course.

    14. What troubles (embarrasses?) me is the ‘E’. I’m not sure if what I say makes sense. I mean that, personally, I would have declined this ‘honour’. The ‘honour’ to be associated with any (colonial) ‘Empire’? No, thank you.

      I think what is more embarrassing to everyone, all Britons anyway, is the stupid dicks who either refuse or return the Honour bestowed upon them. I think it is a terrible slap in the face to the Queen, the Royal Family, other recipients of Honours and to the British people.

      They might think it’s anti- establishment, or fashionably anarchistic. It’s not. It’s an embarrassment to us all.

      ash

    15. I have to disagree with you there, Ash. If people want to refuse, simply out of humility or because, as democrats, pacifists or egalitarians with anti-establishment sympathies they cannot bring themselves to accept the need for monarchy, because doing so encourages deference to an unelected, out-dated institution which serves to perpetuate privilege and inequality, which will only be exploited by politicians anyway, or because they are sickened by the atrocities of our colonial past and don’t wish to have even the most vague association to the British Empire pinned to their chest, that’s fine by me. Fine also if people wish to accept their honour because they were nominated for it by others, after all, who felt they deserved to be recognised for their contribution to society and would not wish to offend others by snubbing it. It’s not as though there’s anything comparable and what a proud occasion for friends and family.

      I don’t think anyone has the right to try and coax Benjamin Zephaniah to just forget about all that nasty slavery for one day and take a trip to the Palace, and I respect him greatly for his position, as I do Danny Boyle for his.

    16. …or because they are sickened by the atrocities of our colonial past and don’t wish to have even the most vague association to the British Empire pinned to their chest, that’s fine by me.

      It’s just what I tried to express (and failed, I know) in a previous comment. Bloody language barrier.

      …if people wish to accept their honour because they were nominated for it by others, after all.

      I didn’t know that, I thought that only The Queen could decide who to reward. I now wonder who these ‘others’ can be…

      1. Anyone can nominate someone for an honour. I don’t know who is responsible for David’s.

        At least two letters of support should accompany the nomination, these are reviewed by an independent committee. Another more specialised committee made up of experts (in the arts and media, science and technology, sport, health, etc.) decides who are the most worthy candidates. They prepare a final list for the Prime Minister, who then gives it to the Queen to approve.

        From the date a nomination is made until the successful candidate appears on an honours list takes a minimum of 18 months. There are two lists: one published at New Year, the other on the Queen’s (official) birthday in June.

    17. Thank you for the crystal clear explanation.

      It amazes me that only two letters of support (by anyone) is enough to start the process.

    18. Firstly, I like the Queen and our Royal Family, most of them anyway. It is a bit sickening this week however, to hear Prince Charles and one of his sons speaking out against hunting of elephants and rhino, when we also got a report of one of his sons hunting in Spain, especially given that the King of Spain was shown in the media in the same week, being photographed with his trophy killed elephant!!!!

      I have to say at that point I did wonder about the one rule for us and another for them. Also a case of do as I say, not as I do.

      Anyway, like I said, I do like the Queen, I think she has been a wonderful ambassador and uniting figure for the country, after all, who really trusts politicians who come and go making a mess and pennies for their own pockets. There aren’t many old values, like Tony Benn, politicians around any more as far as I can see.

      As you pointed out Fed, people are nominated for Honours by the people, OK so they might be vetted or checked up on or something, but ordinary (everyday heroes 🙂 ) people like nurses, charity workers, have received honours.

      This is the modern day, modern day people are being honoured, no one relates any more to the old reasons for honours being awarded and knights and others are not rewarded with (stolen) land or gold or given any powers.

      Maybe the names of the Medals of Honour bestowed upon people by the Queen, the people’s figurehead, should be changed to something else.

      Sorry, I’m still exasperated by people who refuse an Honour. I thought Benjamin Zephaniah was more enlightened, huh, who knew eh? I think Danny Boyle is also being an arse over it (and I loved the opening ceremony, especially the bit with the Queen).

      ash

      1. It is a bit sickening this week however, to hear Prince Charles and one of his sons speaking out against hunting of elephants and rhino, when we also got a report of one of his sons hunting in Spain, especially given that the King of Spain was shown in the media in the same week, being photographed with his trophy killed elephant!!!!

        I thought Morrissey put it perfectly; I wouldn’t lose any sleep if their guns backfired in their faces. Serves them right.

    19. Sorry, I’m still exasperated by people who refuse an Honour. I thought Benjamin Zephaniah was more enlightened, huh, who knew eh? I think Danny Boyle is also being an arse over it (and I loved the opening ceremony, especially the bit with the Queen).

      I think, in accordance with your logic they should be both named an arse. So why do you only honour Danny Boyle with the “title”?

      I hope I have a right to ask this question, FEd? As well as Ash has his/her right to ignore it, if it is very delicate thing…

  7. Top albums for me –

    Richard Thompson – Electric
    Tedeschi Trucks Band – Made Up Mind
    Jeff Healey Band – Live From NYC, recorded in 1988 and only released last year..smoking performance from Jeff who I had the pleasure of seeing in a small club in Belfast 14 years ago..incredible talent.

    Can we also discuss David Moyes at some point. 😉

    1. Can we also discuss David Moyes at some point. 😉

      :)) We could try, Paul, but every time I do, I end up laughing and can’t get the words out. What’s going on at Old Trafford? They’re the same players that topped the league last year.

      Couldn’t happen to a nicer club. 😉

      1. But Tim, I hope at least you can take heart in knowing that, as Liverpool fans who remember glory years of our own, we understand your sadness and frustration at the end of a beautiful period of success and domination coming to an end. We know that pain all too well.

        Let’s sit tight and wait for Chelsea and Manchester City to descend into mid-table mediocrity (and, I hope, crippling debt) and laugh as their loudest supporters quieten down and look for another team to support. We’ll all be able to enjoy that, right?

    2. Susan Tedeschi kicks butt and ain’t too shabby on the guitar either. :p

      The first song of hers I ever heard was Rock Me Right and I was ‘sold’ — reminded me so much of the ‘days of yore’ when Suzi Quatro (circa 1973) was rockin’ up a storm.

    3. What’s going on at Old Trafford? They’re the same players that topped the league last year.

      Sir Alex Ferguson ain’t there anymore.

  8. …I wouldn’t wish any lover of music to forget that 2013 was also the year we lost …

    Trevor Bolder – bassist for Uriah Heep and David Bowie
    Alvin Lee – Ten Years After
    Magic Slim – (not expecting anyone to listen to the whole hour and some but it’s a really good sampling of his style)

    And this I just simply could not resist. :))

    1. ‘How Much Is That Doggie in the Window’ is one of my all-time favourites. How did you know?

      It’s not a window any more, though, it’s a kennel. And you don’t buy, you make a minimum donation.

      Don’t buy, people. Adopt.

  9. 2013 music that I liked/purchased:

    Foy Vance; Joy of Nothing
    Elvis Costello & The Roots; Wise Up Ghost
    The National; Trouble Will Find Me
    Frank Turner; Tape Deck Heart
    Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds; Push The Sky Away
    Josh Tillman; The History of Caves
    Paul McCartney; New
    Kristian Matsson (Tallest Man On Earth)-He didn’t release anything in 2013, I just discovered him in 2013.

    And of course Atoms For Peace; Amok, which I know must be on the top of the list for material FEd wants to hear. . .

    These are older/other recordings that were released/re-released in 2013 that I purchased:

    Jimi Hendrix; People, Hell & Angels. It’s always great hearing new Hendrix, despite how obscure it is.
    Jerry Garcia Band; Volume One, 3/1/80, Capitol Theatre
    Jerry Garcia Band; Volume Two, 8/5/90, Greek Theatre
    King Crimson; Larks’ Tongues in Aspic, The Complete Recordings (Box Set)
    Van Morrison; Moondance [Expanded Edition] in my opinion, the best sounding re-master of 2013 by far.
    Tom Stoppard; Darkside

    I have a copy of ‘1,000 Recordings To Hear Before You Die’ by Tom Moon, published in 2008. Unfortunately it is not numbered, it’s alphabetical, so matching Tim’s numbering scheme probably won’t happen, but there is still a boatload of stuff I need to catch up on. Perhaps that’s why older music is still popular!

    1. And of course Atoms For Peace; Amok, which I know must be on the top of the list for material FEd wants to hear. . .

      Ah, Thom from Radiohead with Flea from the Chili Peppers. I’ll give it a listen.

    2. Oh my system is straightforward Marcus … I’m picking every 10th entry from that alphabetical index (in this way the selection is pleasingly random) ..

      Tangerine Dream – Phaedra (1974) today … now how often would that spring into your head?

      I think I am duty bound to take a gander at Josh Tillman; The History of Caves … and Nick Cave continues to be a breath of fresh air … catch him “Live” if you get the chance ….

    3. Tangerine Dream springs into my head often believe it or not – specifically the Thief soundtrack … Alpha Centauri was my ‘poison’ back in the day though. They also released something ‘new’ in 2013 — One Night in Africa.

  10. I agree it is hard to listen to new artists today. New Day by Bowie is a good album. I also enjoy Arcade Fire’s Reflekion album. These two artists dig each other it seems, also.

    For Pop, I really hope that Kate Perry’s album Prism outranks that twit Miley, and she left her ex who also drives me nuts. How can anyone be influenced by her attitude; especially young teens. I wish Sinead would have sued her ass off too.

    Lastly, my new vehicle has Sirius satellite. Frickin’ unbelievable! Deep Space is my fave channel especially at midnight when Floyd appears for the drive home. I hope I’m allowed to interject on this issue Fed.

    Happy New Year All!

  11. I’m ever so slightly obsessing over The Varese’s, Spotlight – beautifully raw ♥♥♥ – I’m sharing with everyone I know.

    1. Consider it shared …. I’m liking it although I’m getting more “jolly” than “raw” … but then I like my raw meat to be bleeding, still breathing and nailed to the bathroom door.

      Did I just say that out loud?

    2. Perhaps “raw” wasn’t ideal … “gritty” perhaps … slightly off-kilter and not polished. Of course you said that out loud — wouldn’t expect anything less! :))

  12. Couldn’t afford new albums this year. But did buy my 5 year old his first guitar, after hitting a family crisis and now living in a homeless unit with my 2 sons, 3 and 5, thought the time was right to start him playing. I play quite well, never had a lesson, just hope that what I teach him will open his creative side thus with hope in my heart he will bring something new to the table that is fuelled and expressed with raw talent and emotion.

    Good luck Alec H. Love you son. x

    1. Have to agree — Been Caught Cheating is great. Amy would’ve done them proud had she been able to fend off her demons. 🙁

    2. Dare I suggest that that guitar break has more than a whiff of “Bluesy David” about it?

  13. Another album that kind of did it for me was by a band from Norway called Airbag.

    They have just released their 3rd album titled ‘Greatest Show on Earth’ which, for me is OK but not quite as good as their last one ‘All Rights Removed’.

    Not sure if there are any songs available on YouTube but the reason why I mention them here is because their guitarist is clearly influenced by David Gilmour. Check them out and see what you think.

  14. (Aren’t all these awards just a load of bullshit, anyway? Yeah, OK, so I’ve never forgiven the Brits for giving Best British Group and Best British Album to Blur, not Pink Floyd, in 1995 and probably never will.)

    With regard to awards, I think they are for people in the business to get together for a (huge) dinner party. We the public only ever hear who won what, we don’t go to the event, we only know what we see in the media. Award ceremonies mean absolutely nothing to the public I think.

    There you said it, any award ceremony that could place Bleugh above the Floyd, just shows how shallow it all is.

    While it would be nice corporate/public validation for Pink Floyd to have won, they didn’t need any such validation and did get a Grammy (that same year I believe). And we’ll never forget that they remained on the Billboard 200 for 14 consecutive years with Dark Side of the Moon and then tack on another 2 years here and there. And long after all is said and done and many generations have come and gone, Blur will be but a blur, and Pink Floyd will remain and have its rightful place in music history.

  15. Happy new year to you too and everybody.

    For me, the very album of 2013 was Black Sabbath. They kept the style and harmony 20 years ago, better live in Brazil.

    I’m still working on my compositions and I hope to have time to close my first project.

    I wonder: When can I see and hear David Gilmour playing live again?

    1. I wonder: When can I see and hear David Gilmour playing live again?

      We’re all wondering this, my friend. Nothing’s planned just yet.

      Good luck with your music.

  16. Nice one Pavlov.

    When I saw you had a Steven Wilson album in your top picks for 2013 I knew we shared some tastes.

    Did you catch the tour?

    1. I did not Pete … only two concerts for me this year — one was for my husband’s benefit (well worth it) and the other was something that I absolutely needed to do (a childhood lyrical icon and social commentator, Rodriguez).

      Schedule constraints limit attending concerts and more often than not, the ticket prices are just prohibitive!

  17. Hi!

    Have you listened to “Thao and The Get Down Stay Down” with “We The Common”? A fresh release from the states.

    Also there have been some interesting releases in Scandinavia…. but maybe you only listen to releases in English?

    1. That’s a happy little number with a feel-good video to match. Thanks, Ingunn.

      Please share whatever you enjoy most from Scandinavia, regardless of language. Although they do all sing in English, I’m very fond of both The Blue Van (Dear Independence is such a great album) and Paintbox, and recently discovered Them Bird Things. Their Pachyderm Nightmares should definitely be on my 2013 list. I love it almost as much as I love Sami Hyypiä, actually. 😉

  18. Hello everyone.

    It’s the first time for me that I share my feelings, my valueless and illusioned point of view on a blog. I don’t know if it would interest you all, but I thought that a French teenager’s opinions and questions would be acceptable to continue the subject on Music, teenagers and, more globally, the future…

    To develop rapidly what I think about all this, I think more and more that we (teenagers, future worker, new “generation”) are going to a dead end.

    Indeed, every day seems to be one step further to this dead end, explained by the events of each day: financial disparities/catastrophies, climate change, overpowered medias, stubborned mentalities… Whatever we do and wherever we want to go, the path to “succeed” in life appears to me like a huge obstacle itself; when I listen to people, they seem to say that everything has been invented and that our next generation becomes the “poor” one.

    Personally, I have the objective/dream to change the music boundaries and reform it. I don’t know everything on it, not every artists, but I can easily see that what me create nowadays is simply muddy and puny. What we name today Pop seems not the same 30 years ago, but if pop is a way to say “simpler” or even “undistinguish”…

    I would need pages to write on this subject, but I tried to be brief.

    What do you think of today’s music sincerely? Do you think that taking blues style and transforming it signifies doing the same thing again and again; just like the older ones did 40 years ago? What do you think of the 60s music revolution that introduced a new way of thinking?

    Well, sorry for the mumbo jumbo I did and also for the mistakes! And I don’t even know if what I say interesting in fact…

    Thank you for your attention and, please, do not hesitate to express what you feel about it all.

    1. What do you think of today’s music sincerely? Do you think that taking blues style and transforming it signifies doing the same thing again and again; just like the older ones did 40 years ago?

      Well, writing not as a musician (which I think is important to stress because I couldn’t make music so have to respect anyone who can, even if I don’t like it), I think there’s only so much any musician can get from his or her musical instrument(s), so it’s no surprise that so much of it sounds alike after, let’s say, seventy years of Rock and Roll. I don’t know how anyone could possibly sound original today, because surely it’s all been done before several times over. So I don’t mind that it’s unoriginal; I’d much rather hear familiar styles and sounds that I can enjoy, made by young people who are influenced by the same musicians I’ve always admired. Jake Bugg being a case in point.

    2. How nice and reassuring to ‘see’ a teenager – a foreign teenager – who is interested in this blog, interested enough to take time to contribute to it.

      About the so called ‘musical generation gap’, I think it has always existed. I’m not a teen, but I remember my parents telling me in the past when I was adolescent that the music I listened to was total crap compared to theirs. :)) Parents, eh? 😉

      I don’t care if music is original or not, music touches (not sure of the word) or not, that’s all.

      Today (music of 2013), I really enjoy listening to Belgian Stromae and French duet (from Toulouse) Cats On Trees (absolutely not original, I know, no need to tell me it just sounds like Amy Macdonald). Silly, eh? But true.

    3. Cats On Trees remind me something more interesting than Amy Macdonald. Ah, maybe Graffiti On the Train.

  19. I’m also not a musician, but I think that at least some of the developments / evolution of music has has a technological aspect … For example everybody prizes Guitars from the 1950s and 1960s but the rock guitar sound was only made possible with developments in amplification and effects. Similarly, multi tracking and then digital recording changed what was possible in the studio, synthesisers, drum machines and sequencers created new instruments and new sounds unimagined by the Blues / Rock pioneers, and the Rock Show has, quite recently become far grander and more ambitious with developments in staging, visual displays and lighting. Anyone who has caught Old Roger’s Wall show and compares it to the scarce footage of the original show can see a demonstration of that.

    We always find it hard to imagine what the next technological developments will be and what effect they will have, but we can be sure there will be some.

    We can also see that music has reflected developments in society, from aspiration for freedom to rebellion, from peace and love to post-apocalyptic gloom, so as society changes we can expect music to change … Think for example of the cultural impact of globalisation and the development of new markets for music.

    What also remains true, however, is that a basic need for simple, honest musical expression will prevail, and, marvellous creatures that we are, fresh talent will come along and there will always be something fresh and new … Well let’s hope so anyway.

    Oh and glad to hear from you … We love TheFrench here especially as they rarely speak mumbo jumbo and we love the fact that you even know what it is!

  20. FEd,

    I don’t agree with your point of view because if everyone thought like you do, well musicians, and more generally artists (because we’re artists before practicing perfectly the instrument, and this is not how music is taught nowadays), there wouldn’t be a development and discoveries anymore… If everyone did the same thing, copied and just “turned” it/transform it the way they know to play it, it would problematic! One day, one has to do the first step and propose something out of the common way, like an anti-conformist.

    This is not a fatality; one day, a man like Jimi Hendrix will play completely differently as everyone do, and then others will follow. And that was indeed the fact in the 70s: Hendrix/Clapton and others knew how to play the electric guitar and use the effects that they had at that time, and they played basically! And concerning the effects, groups such as Pink Floyd exploited a lot to sort it all out!

    So, for me, this would be more a question of time, technology, history and mentality that would be the primordial factors.

    What do you think? Are you absolutely sure that the real Music is dead, taking into account what I’ve said of course?

    1. What do you think? Are you absolutely sure that the real Music is dead, taking into account what I’ve said of course?

      Well, I don’t think it’s dead, and I hope you’re right about another Jimi Hendrix coming along some day. 🙂

      Right now I think the most we can hope for is for youngsters to merge several positive influences together and create something that sounds slightly familiar.

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