Guy in Australia

Just to make you aware, if you’re not already, that Guy Pratt is touring Australia at the moment with his new comedy show, ‘Breakfast of Idiots’.

It’s a great gig, so do go along if you’re able to.

For details of venues, dates and ticket sales, please click here.

There’s currently an extremely generous two-for-the-price-of-one ticket deal at some theatres, so now you’ve got no excuse to miss out as well as a little left in your pocket to buy Guy a drink or three after the show, which I believe is a compulsory requirement as printed on the reverse of the tickets alongside the token blurb about cameras and recording equipment being unwelcome.

In other news, Fender would like to hear of your “first, best, worst or just overall most memorable ever” concert recollections, the best of which will be featured on their website as part of their Fender Concert Series.

Simply e-mail your memories, including your name and whereabouts, to share@fender.com. If you care to repeat them here for our benefit, please do.

Have a good weekend, everybody.

Author: FEd

Features Editor of David Gilmour’s official blog, The Blog (‘Features’ previously being its rather naff title), affectionately – or lazily – shortened to ‘FEd’.

41 thoughts on “Guy in Australia”

  1. Good luck with your new comedy tour Guy Pratt!!!

    Have a good weekend Fed.

    Barbara P

  2. Happy 91st Birthday to Mr Mandela, symbol of freedom, equality, tolerance, forgiveness…

    Such wonderful words, so sad they often remain only words.

    A beautiful tribute to him, here.

    Michèle

  3. Good luck to Guy – I can recommend his stand up show. He’s very funny with great delivery and some really great stories.

  4. Thanks FED,

    He will be on the Gold Coast on the 28th July at the Gold Coast Arts centre.

    For tickets call 55884000. For more info, click here.

    Cheers,
    snow.

  5. I just sent my memory of Pink Floyd playing The Wall in 1980 at Nassau Coliseum outside of New York. It was the highlight of my life, and I had just turned 14 at the time! A wall was built in front of the band as they played.

    I have fond memories of David atop the wall to sing/play the solos in “Comfortably Numb” with, I think, his famous black Strat.

  6. Hi all,

    I hope Guy’s show eventually makes it over here to the states. I’d love to go see it.

    Hope you had a great birthday, Frank!

    ~Erin

    1. Happy Birthday Frank… I know it’s been a tough year or so but hang in there.

      I have new Boomers on my Tele and Strat so I’m just waiting for your call. 🙂

  7. Sitting listen to David sing on PBS.

    I was at UC Berkeley in the 60s and then still an activist in the 70s. In fact still am trying to change the world. Your vocals are so what I associate with Pink Floyd and being alive and out in the world full force. I play Dark Side… still over and over. I’m 66. That’s ridiculous.

    And I loved when Portland Ballet used it for a great performance. I saw it 5 times. Still makes my heart sing and my feet dance.

  8. Last I heard, Guy’s new comedy show changed its named to “Breakfast of Crickets”.

    *chirp* *chirp* *chirp*

  9. Dear David,

    I’m a big fan of yours. In fact, I am a musician who aspires to play as well as you do. I was wondering if you could answer a few questions:

    1. What inspires you to write and create the more recent years of Pink Floyd? For example, what’s the Division Bell to you and what’s Learning To Fly really about in your personal life?

    2. How did you learn to play guitar with such severe solos and brightness? For example, Comfortably Numb is an outstanding solo song and did it originally sound that deep? What was the creative process?

    Thanks for your many years of music and for your time today…

    Ronald

    1. Ronald…

      From previous interviews with DG, he has answered some of your questions.

      Learning To Fly is about the experiences DG had whilst he was learning to fly… this is a quote from a BBC interview:

      “Intrepid Aviation was a way for me to make my hobby pay for itself a little bit, but gradually over a few years Intrepid Aviation became a business because you have to be businesslike about it. Suddenly I found instead of it being a hobby and me enjoying myself, it was a business and so I sold it. I don’t have Intrepid Aviation any more. I just have a nice old biplane that I pop up, wander around the skies in sometimes…”

      Regarding Comfortably Numb, this is some info from Guitar World:

      “In Guitar World there are details on David Gilmour’s Comfortably Numb solo stating that the solo (most likely the outro solo) was pieced together from several other solos that Gilmour had been experimenting with at the time. In August 2006, it was voted the greatest guitar solo of all time in a poll by listeners of digital radio station Planet Rock.”

    2. HI THERE FROM NC, RONALD!

      HAPPENED TO READ YOUR NOTE TO MR GILMOUR AND ALTHOUGH I CAN’T ANSWER FOR DAVID, I CAN TELL YOU A GOOD DIRECTION TO START LOOKING IN FOR YOUR IMPROVEMENT IN GUITAR PLAYING – BUILD THE MUSCLES UP IN YOUR ARMS AND HANDS.

      TRY SQUEEZING A RUBBER BALL OR GETTING A GRIP-MASTER. THIS WILL HELP YOU WITH CONTROL OVER ENDURANCE AND HAND FATIGUE WHILE PLAYING FOR 2 HOURS PLUS ON A HOT STAGE. THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT IS IMPORTANT TO FIND AS IT CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SOMEONE WHO IS DISCOURAGED OR INSPIRED.

      DEDICATION TO A REGULAR PRACTICE SCHEDULE IS IMPORTANT. 2 HOURS A DAY OR MORE. LEARN ALL THE BASICS FIRST. LEARN HOW TO PUT FEELING INTO WHAT YOU PLAY. LISTEN TO THE LIVE VERSION OF ECHOES AND DAVID’S SOLO FROM THAT ONE. VACUUM TUBES, VALVES, ONLY TUBES CAN SING THAT WAY! OR THE LIVE VERSION OF MONEY.

      KEEP PLAYING, I KNOW I WILL!

      GOOD LUCK RONALD!

  10. Hi everybody,

    it’s my birthday today, I’m 25. I would like to invite you all for a beer…

    Piero

    1. Could we have a nice Chianti instead of beer, please, Piero?

      Happy Birthday! 🙂

  11. Good luck to Guy on his ‘Breakfast of Idiots’ tour down under. Hope he remembers to let his audiences know how ‘The Ashes’ are progressing… 😛

    Whilst on the Aussie theme, I’m looking forward to seeing a Pink Floyd tribute next Monday (purely on David’s recommendation, of course).

    I don’t know if anyone else has heard ‘In A Broken Dream’ featuring David yet (it can be heard here), he was certainly on fine form back in ’92.

  12. It would be wonderful if I could have recollections to share with you about any of Pink Floyd’s or David’s concerts, but, unfortunately, for many reasons, I never had the chance to see them/him playing. 🙁

    The greatest concert I’ve ever seen was the Genesis at Circo Massimo, Rome, in July 2007.

    I don’t say that for the music only (because, even if the gig was perfect, I prefer their 70s music to the songs they played that night), but for the event in general. It was a free concert, there were more than 500.000 people and we all had to wait under the sun for hours, but the atmosphere was so relaxing and everyone so friendly that I felt like we had gone back to the 60s or 70s, even if I can only imagine it, since I wasn’t born, yet.

    Maybe it’s just me, but that “good vibration” has become hard to find today.

    We had a 4 day music festival in my city this weekend, called ItaliaWave Love Festival. The main stage included Placebo, Kraftwerk, Aphex Twin and Ska-P, but there were lots of other bands playing everywhere, conferences, camping…

    Maybe it was the kind of music, but I didn’t like the feeling at all. I went around and all I saw were many (not only young) people sitting everywhere, lots of dirt and lots of alcohol and drugs. It seems music and communication were completely irrelevant.

    A music festival should be something more than this, I think, or am I too old to understand?

    Sorry for the long comment, FEd. 🙂

    1. Maybe it was the kind of music, but I didn’t like the feeling at all. I went around and all I saw were many (not only young) people sitting everywhere, lots of dirt and lots of alcohol and drugs. It seems music and communication were completely irrelevant.

      A music festival should be something more than this, I think, or am I too old to understand?

      Perhaps I shouldn’t say it, but that’s precisely why I personally felt that David, Richard and the band missed very little by missing out on Glastonbury.

      Then again, maybe it’s great from the stage and just grim, in my humble opinion, from the Pimm’s-soaked mud.

    2. Re: 2008 Glastonbury Festival

      But I read somewhere that it was Richard’s last wish to take part in this event. Don’t know if it’s true (because I can’t imagine him enjoying such an event), but if so, it’s very sad he wasn’t allowed to do it.

    3. I also read it somewhere, Michèle, I can’t remember where.

      I don’t know much about Glastonbury Festival, I just visited the website some time ago, but, if it’s a music festival like all the others, I also don’t think it would have been the right place for David, Richard and the band.

      Yes, maybe from the stage it’s all different, but where is the satisfaction in playing in front of a mass of people who are there to go out of mind, instead of listening to the music?

      I know someone could answer me now, saying that there’s nothing new with it, since it often happened the same in the 60s/70s, but I don’t think so.

      The difference is in the meaning of it all.

      It seems to me there’s absolutely no rebellion in those people today and no new ideas to promote.

      Maybe I’m wrong, but all I can see is a lot of bored people who pretend to enjoy the event and another lot who would actually enjoy it, but they can’t because of the wrong feeling.

      And I’m quite often in the second group. :/

    4. Alessandra,

      Sometimes the planets and stars line up just right to give that full experience of a concert event.

      I’ve seen hundreds of shows and some were fabulous while others were just OK and some were just awful. Fact is that it is not always just what is going on onstage that makes it memorable it is the whole experience.

      One of my most memorable shows was seeing Elton John and Eric Clapton perform at Shea Stadium in NY. With a double bill like that you expect a phenomenal performance. But what made it even more special was that it was right around my wife’s birthday, we were strapped for funds so we bought some sandwiches on the way and had our own tailgate picnic. The weather was a perfect Summer evening. We bought the tickets the day before when they released more seats and were surprised with fabulous field seats. It wasn’t 10th row but it also wasn’t all the way in the back. Then add EJ and EC and it was just perfect.

      Thanks.

      Andrew

    5. Fact is that it is not always just what is going on onstage that makes it memorable it is the whole experience.

      That’s true. Those “special moments” usually happen when you’re not expecting anything like that. As in your example, sometimes the state of mind can make the difference.

      It’s sad, but, if we talk about music shows, I have to say that I find harder and harder to live that kind of feeling.

      I usually go to a concert with a very positive state of mind, but recently, it often happened that I had to change it, because I didn’t like what I saw around me.
      It’s very disappointing.

      It could be that I’m a little hypercritical. 😉

    6. A Glastonbury audience wouldn’t appreciate something as stunning as David and Richard and the band.

      People that go there, go just so they can say they went to Glastonbury, like it’s some pilgrimage to the mother of festivals. It was over commercialised with no real spirit for music, just a money spinner, a very very long time ago (in my opinion).

      ash X

  13. Just back from the Scottish Highlands… Jaysus, what a place. Glencoe is just incredible!

    I was lucky enough to see Guy doing his standup show and it’s well worth a visit!

  14. My memory has to be The Wall, Earls Court, London, 1980 and 81.

    And in 1979 I saw Whitesnake at Preston Guildhall who were fabulous. Coverdale, Moody, Pace and Jon Lord on keyboards.

    Damian

  15. Hi FEd,

    good luck to Guy for the tour/comedy but what about the same tour in Italy next Fall or Winter?

    A hug from Rome,
    diana

  16. Have a good weekend FEd! That goes for everyone else, too. 🙂

    Haven’t been on the Blog for some weeks now, due to illness and general end-of-degree-stress – but I am better now and back for good!

    Got a First Class Honours Degree, too. 😀

  17. I’ve submitted my Fender Concert Series recollections which was about two Fender Telecaster stalwarts… Rossi and Parfitt of Status Quo.

    As Quo are one of the Fedmeister’s favourite bands, I thought I would regale you with the story… :/

    1975, Cardiff Capitol Theatre, United Kingdom. I was 15 and this was my first ever concert. It was Status Quo supported by Shanghai.

    We arrived in Cardiff early in the morning on the day of the concert so we decided to take a look at the venue. We stood outside the doors of the Theatre at about 9am. We found that one of the doors was open so we stepped inside the foyer. No-one was there but we could here guitars and drums in the theatre.

    The doors to the theatre itself were open so we stepped in and sat in the back row… we very quiet and didn’t move. No-one took any notice of us because we were so quiet. Throughout the day the stage was set up and during the afternoon Shanghai turned up for a soundcheck and played a few songs. Francis Rossi then walked on stage and jammed with Shanghai!

    After Rossi finished the curtains opened and we could see the wall of amplifiers and Quo did a full soundcheck! We spoke to a young boy who was about 9 years old and he turned out to be Rossi’s son! About an hour before the doors were due to open one of the stage crew asked us if we would leave and he took us to the door and stood us at the front of the line-up!

  18. I forgot to say it.

    Good luck to Guy Pratt with his new show, I’m sure it will be a success. 🙂

    Unfortunately, for the moment it’s really too far from here.

  19. Happy Birthday Piero and Thanks Erin.

    I wrote my story about my first ever concert and it was 1973 to see DSOTM Tour, courtesy seat from my Bro.

    NY Dan, The Wall Concert at Naussau Colisseum was fantastic, I wonder if we bumped into each other there. 8)

  20. Thanks Guy,

    I had a great time, talk about up close and personal. Lots of laughs and I must admit I did have a tear in my eye at one stage.

    One of my favourite stories was about David’s 50th, I woke up thinking about this with a big smile and then proceeded to play my recently acquired MFSL version of DSOTM.

    I don’t think that I will ever be able to listen to “Learning to Fly” again without having a big home grown grin on my face.

    I’m looking forward to reading the book. You are the “Ace of Bass”.

    Cheers and thanks again,
    snow.

Comments are closed.